My Daughter Isn’t a Pretty Girl

After reading this post from John Adams at dadbloguk it reminded me of a pet hate of mine.

Why is it that the first thing people comment on when they see my daughter is her looks?

Don’t get me wrong she is a little cutie. Yet there is so much more to her than her hair and looks.

She has a cheeky personality, loves climbing, playing ball, sitting with a book and “reading”, is very independent already (she’s only 19 months old) but will try to put her own shoes on. 

Little Miss OMG exploring.

Is a social butterfly and many other wonderful traits that will serve her well in life. Yet even today, in the 21st Century, she seems to be defined by her looks already.
Is it any wonder we get such discrepancies in Boys and Girls magazine covers, as I discussed in this post.

So please if you meet a friend with their daughter don’t tell them how pretty she is, or how lovely her hair is. Pay her any other compliment that doesn’t involve her looks. 

Don’t plant that seed in her developing mind that as a girl looks are what matter.

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15 thoughts on “My Daughter Isn’t a Pretty Girl

  1. This is something that bugs me too actually. Everyone always has to comment on the girls looks & whilst it is nice it’s also rather boring. People seem so concerned with looks they ignore whats inside the person. I’ve had to tell a few visitors off when they point out my girls look scruffy.. AT HOME. Does it honestly matter how girly and neat they look? I dont see the point in dressing them up constantly when we are busy reading , playing, writing etc yet people never notice that Eva is sat there reading books at the age of 6 sounding out words even I struggle to say out loud! Or that Izzy at 2 can complete the wooden alphabet puzzle saying each letter as she goes. I’d much rather they noticed that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know. Thankfully I’ve not had the she’s dressed scruffy yet. It’s no wonder that from an even younger age girls are obsessed with looks.
      Little Miss OMG is happiest when climbing, splashing or rolling in the muck. I’m not going to stop her and certainly not going to put nice clothes on her for those sorts of activities.
      When we have someone to go where a smart dresscode is required she will wear dresses or skirts.
      But it just gets me that with her all people compliment her on is her looks and hair…
      Thanks for reading and the lovely comment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Its more their hair that gets mentioned.. Im supposed to comb & hairspray it so it sticks down & looks perfect… To play indoors 😂😂😂😂 a few find it awful I let girls wear jogging bottoms.. Because of course they need to be ready for a fashion parade at any moment! I love making them look nice for days out too but think they should be able to be comfy & warm & not feel like they are constantly on show especially at home. This reallybsi a great post!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Totally get this ! I get it more now I’ve a second I’ll get ” ah she’s beautiful ” but then don’t comment on my older one and this really bugs me, as it’s all looks I hate it ! Xx

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great post! Looks seem to be the most crucial thing in today’s world, apart from they simply aren’t. Sure who doesn’t want to make an effort and feel good about themselves, but do it for that reason, yourself! We’re planting mind altering seeds that may be irreversible 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yep it’s different for an older child dressed up for an occasion. When it’s at a toddler there is no need.
      I’m even giving out to her brothers who will say it to her when she is dressed in the morning!
      Thanks for reading and commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Little Miss OMG sounds very much like my Miss L. She’s a free spirit, has her own style consisting mostly of jeans and anything black (she will wear a dress, coupled with her black hi top converse trainers) and her hair is generally, dragged through a hedge backwards style. I wouldn’t have her any other way!

    Liked by 1 person

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